Nov / Dec 2017 Issue
“Empathy”

Columns

Hospitality and Hosting Relationships in Michael Rakowitz’s Art


Since 1998, the artist Michael Rakowitz has been constructing his "paraSITE" structures and placing them in public, in New York City, Boston, Cambridge (Massachusetts), and Baltimore. The structures, made of plastic bags, tubing, and...

Strategies & Resources

Below the Surface: Creating Hope through Portraiture


Self-image can be a difficult topic to address, with people of all ages and backgrounds. Today, with social media, blogging, and digital autobiographies, we all hope to control the way we are perceived. Who are you—to yourself, to...

Reading Critically: Alexandra Bell’s “Counternarratives”


Since January 2017, Alexandra Bell’s large prints have been spotted around the Bed-Stuy, Crown Heights, and Bushwick neighborhoods of Brooklyn, New York. Many of these public works were installed by the artist without permission; others, such as...

Dominate Anonymity: An Interview with Guy Woueté


Cameroonian artist Guy Woueté takes inspiration from everyday life to create his paintings, photographs, sculptures, and mixed media works. Socially critical, his work addresses...

Patient Time Scripts: Revisiting the Work of Sokhaya Charles Nkosi

Same Mdluli details the significance of Sokhaya Charles Nkosi’s work, created in response to the conditions of his people during apartheid in South Africa.

Empathy in Training: Kerry Tribe’s “Standardized Patient”


Can empathy be taught? The Los Angeles–based artist and filmmaker Kerry Tribe ponders this question in her most recent video installation, Standardized Patient. The work examines the...

Orawan Arunrak: Words to Communicate


When I ask Orawan Arunrak what she thinks about the word empathy, she answers in a typically cryptic manner. In the Thai language, the artist explains, it may translate roughly as “to take...

Teaching with Contemporary Art

Radical Art in a Conservative School


Radical art uses provocative imagery to convey a variety of confrontational and controversial ideas. Radical art should make viewers question assumptions and think in new ways; such thoughts often go against conservative ideologies. Teaching in a conservative school can be...

Booked

How Did We Get Here? A Reading List for Understanding Race in America


In the current political climate, America's racial toxicity is amplified  and exploited through a revisionist lens. Through our current presidential administration, racial anxieties have found a public platform. Americans are retreating from...

Composing Compassion: On Jumana Manna’s “A Magical Substance Flows Into Me”


Since watching "A Magical Substance Flows Into Me," I’ve been craving pickles. In the film’s first sequence, there is a bloody close-up of a huge jar of red pickled turnips in a kitchen window. It’s an extraordinary shot, and the...

Teaching with Contemporary Art

Keep it Real, Keep it Relevant


Student engagement should be considered before a student even walks through the door of a classroom. If as educators we have not thought about our students before our personal interests, the content we hope to convey will never...

The Poetry of Everyday Life: An Interview with Project Row Houses Director Eureka Gilkey


Founded in 1993 by African-American artists and activists who wanted to enact a positive, creative presence in their community, Project Row Houses (PRH) is an arts nonprofit in Houston’s Third Ward. The organization provides...

Robots, Race, and Algorithms: Stephanie Dinkins at Recess Assembly


“Who are your people?” Since 2014, the artist Stephanie Dinkins has asked the social robot BINA48 this question several times. Developed by Hanson Robotics in 2010, BINA48 was...

Letter from the Editor

Living in an Age of Empathy


“We don’t live in an age of reason, we live in an age of empathy,” states the Dutch psychologist, primatologist, and ethologist Frans de Waal.1 In a time of still growing poverty, more frequent...